Joyce Lu

PROJECT 1: Masters Of Control

Assigned Masterworks:  The Jetsons (1962) home scenes & iRobot Roomba (today)

Recreation: Helping hand, or…?

Domestic robots aim to bring convenience, freeing up time for us to do more. It’s perfect when it works fine, however, there’s still times when something breaks down, or when technology isn’t at our fingertips, such as when we lose our cell phone, and we’re left helpless, frustrated, not able to complete even a simple task. Helping hand, or…? is a skit that takes the class through the enactment of this through Jane’s encounters.

The skit opens with Jane waking up to a cleaned room, thanks to the Roomba, which helped vacuumed the room while she was asleep. In the next scene, going into midweek, Jane enjoys the convenience of remotely setting her Roomba to clean her home in preparation for a friend’s visit later that same evening. The skit took a turn in the closing scene, where Jane returned home to a stuck Roomba, helpless and frustrated as she couldn’t get the Roomba to work, nor had access to other cleaning tools, and her friends were due to arrive shortly.


PROJECT 2: The Command: Buttons

Flui

Designer: Joyce Lu

ArchetypeGrowth

Context: Despite technological advancement transforming how we interact with our cities and with each other, our basic needs to sleep, eat, work and get from place to place stay the same. For the last couple of decades, cities were planned for cars, paving parking lots and proposing urban freeways. In the next decades to come, urban infrastructure will go through a transformation. How will going from one point to the other be like in the near future? Will we still be accessing services from smartphones? As physical and digital worlds converge, where will user interfaces live outside our smartphones?

Product: Flui is a ride share service for conscious urban dwellers. It knows its users’ schedules and confirms a ride plans for their daily commute, helping to maximize and optimize road use in congested cities, while providing a fluid end-to-end user experience. One of its key touch points, is the Flui button, placed on desk or wall, subtly notify its users, only at the right time, if a ride should be confirmed and requested, according to his or her daily schedule.  Its form factor and visual feedback are intended to communicate fluid and elegance.  


PROJECT 2: The Command: Do What I Mean

Flui

Designer:  Joyce Lu

ArchetypeGrowth

Context: Despite technological advancement transforming how we interact with our cities and with each other, our basic needs to sleep, eat, work and get from place to place stay the same. For the last couple of decades, cities were planned for cars, paving parking lots and proposing urban freeways. In the next decades to come, urban infrastructure will go through a transformation. How will going from one point to the other be like in the future? Will we still be accessing services from smartphones? As physical and digital worlds converge, where will user interfaces live outside our smartphones?  

As a continuation from part 1, I explored how Flui may manifest in a broadened scope, considering a larger context of the future of urban mobility, for someone who commutes on a fixed daily routine and someone who is always on-the-go. How will Flui live, as a personal, fixed versus on-the-go solution, or in a shared public space?

Product: Flui is a ride share service for conscious urban dwellers. It knows its users’ schedules and confirms a ride plans for their daily commute, helping to maximize and optimize road use in congested cities, while providing a fluid end-to-end user experience.

A fixed Flui button from part 1, will be used by Sarah, who commutes between her home at Santa Clara and her office in San Francisco, on a daily basis. John, a sales engineer, is always on-the-go, hopping from one city to another. With Flui on-the-go, a nearby registered Flui car, equipped with self-driving technology, not in used by its owner, goes to where John is and picks him up. With Flui on-the-go, John despite being a visitor, has access to shared cars from the local community.

Flui on-the-go button shares the same form as the larger fixed button at home or office. Both Flui buttons also share a consistent visual signalling behaviors (blinks & glows), while only Flui on-the-go is equipped with tactile feedback.

 


Project 3-The Arrival: old dogs, new tricks

SkillPass

Designer: Joyce Lu

Archetype: Constraint

Context: Amid a challenging global environment of technology disruptions and widening income equality, artificial intelligence, after years of hype and debate, brings workplace automation not just to physically intensive roles and repetitive routines but also to a wide range of other tasks. Technological advancements are destroying job market opportunities faster than they create in struggling cities, while organizations and businesses struggle to find the right person with appropriate skills and experience to staff projects. Staffing coordinators have tried to step into the breach, but their efforts, even when effective, are necessarily limited in scale.

Product: To protect the economy and restore growth to the job market, the government mandates that all citizens, permanent residents and non-immigrant temporary workers are registered on SkillPass. Leveraging big data and artificial intelligence, SkillPass is a nation-wide platform that the government has initiated to match people to jobs, it consists of a profile-based, nationwide directory of people’s skills, performance in previous assignments, working styles, personality traits, availability, and locations.

 


Project 4-The Gathering: strength in numbers

The Dumpling School

Designers: Beizi (Ricky) Zhang, Jessica (Jieyu) Yang, Joyce Lu

Archetype: Constraint

Context: About 3% of the world population, live outside their country of origin today, and the number is continuing to rise. As more people move to either settle permanently or work temporarily away from home, they bring with them some parts of their culture, leading to an increasingly unified world culture that consists of adapted cultural trends. Meanwhile, traditional skills and crafts, including cooking, are dying as people spend more time and place more emphasis on work.

We live in paradoxical times, of a cross-cultural dilemma, we may speak the same language, but do we really understand each other? We interpret subjectively, we jump to conclusions, we look at the world through eyes and lenses that’s designed to correct our vision, and not the other person’s, we stereotype.

Product: The Dumpling School is a social enterprise that partners with high schools to run week-long workshops to educate and develop cultural intelligence in high school students. Equipped with gloves that would track and help guide hand gestures when making dumplings, students learn to make dumplings in a fun and engaging way, while appreciating the differences and similarities across cultures.

At the Dumpling School, students learn to make Dumplings of world. It brings back face to face, hands on learning experience to counter balance online existences. It inspires more active and shared learning possibilities for connections and exchange.

 

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